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20130115
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
fourchlg the taliban, to try to reshape the environment there, and to try to maneuver the various players in the region towards negotiated outcome because there was no military outcome. that seems not to have gone well. in the absence of that, what is the strategic course? the strategic course is now to minimize american vulnerability in these areas. not walk afrom afghanistan, as has happened in the past. try to give afghanistan some choices, but for security and to try to get away from what i think is the free riding problem where president obama is free riding on security, and not moving governments forward to get other stake holding in the rest of the country. i think the president has moved that security blanket in part to change the dynamic in the region. he is also committed to rebalancing attention on asia, and he is taking military forces out should they be needed for iran and other matters. this is a very shrewd, smart move that i think the wlous is making. >> now, what we're seeing here, as well, is that they -- we just -- we're told that there's a two-minute warning. they do n
today it will still be a dangerous environment. we will still need to do force protection, but the mission will change this is how we start to leave and it will happen as of this spring which is a surprise. faster than anybody said it would happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey. holey with an "e," not ah. this is because of the progress that's been made in terms of after began security forces, capacity to take the lead. i don't really know anything about the strength of afghan security forces and neither do you, unless you are just back from the war, which case, welcome home. but the pentagon's report to congress on that subject which reportedly was ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official u.s. pentagon report on the readiness of afghan security forces, far from afghan security forces ready to take the lead, out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades capable of operating independently without support from international or u
be a dangerous environment, that we will still need to do force protection. but the mission is going to change. this is how we start to leave. and it's going to happen as of this spring, which is a surprise, which is faster than anybody said it was going to happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey, not holy as in ahh. president obama saying the acceleration was possible in part because of what has been made in terms of afghan security forces, their capacity to take the lead. i don't know anything about afghan security forces, and neither do you unless you're newly back from the war, and welcome home, but the pentagon's report on that suggest which was reportedly ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official pentagon support on the readiness of afghan security forces says far from afghan security forces being ready to take the lead, it says out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades is capable of operating independently without support from internationa
you would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we flive today. i think something else is important here and cer
a clunker for the environment. they say the program produced tons of unnecessary waste while doing little to curb greenhouse gas emissions. the emphasis was on car shredding and not recycling even though they say cars are almost completely recyclable. if they had recycled just metal and plastic it would have saved 24 million barrels of oil. department of transportation deemed cash for clung ears success. >> welfare recipients are taking out cash at new york strip clubs liquor stores and x-rated shops and presumably spending it there. they looked at 200 million or ebt records. the food stamp programs bans purchase of booze and lottery tickets with ebt card but cash assistance and is intended to spent on housing and utilities and household necessities can be obtained at atms. a senior fellow says, quote. i don't blame riptsd, if you are poor, its crummy life and you wanted to have a drink or see a naked woman. i blame the people who are in charge of this. >> a massachusetts democratic governor is downplaying the news his state cannot locate 19,000 people who have either been receiving welfa
problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
. >> do you think there is a way we can do corporate reform in this environment? >> is extremely difficult but i think one really positive thing that came out of this fiscal debates this time is that for the first time in a long time, the business community unified around a concept of getting our deficit under control. they were not as worried about their individual tax breaks that might go as a result of having some reform. i hope that mood continues. that was a one group does not argue over one other or about accelerated depreciation and so forth. i am more hopeful that a more unified view from the business community is possible this time. >> i want to say one thing -- i'm not fully knowledgeable about this. i was at a meeting earlier today we're in noted tax expert said you cannot do corporate reform and not to individual reform because when we change the parameters, a whole lot of entities shifted from c corporations to other forms that were taxed on the individual side. if you lower rates on the corporate tax and get away with some of the preferences for oil and gas and various things
attacks, the united states is susceptible to that environment. it's not only here in the united states but u.s. interests around the world. and that's why the u.s. has to maintain or believes it has to maintain that presence there. there's no doubt that going forward many of these issues are going to come to the surface. afghanistan could find itself in a very bloody civil war. iraq after the u.s. withdrawal has not gotten necessarily better. there's still violence. there are still attacks. but to some extent u.s. interests are a little more secured as a result of what happened there in the eyes of, you know, the united states officials that pursued that war. so again, you could make the argument that in afghanistan something similar could happen. but there's no doubt a great deal of uncertainty, great deal of questions remain. as to whether or not the central government in afghanistan can actually control the military and preserve the security, integrity of that country. and that remains to be seen. >> if only we could predict the future. all right, ayman, good to see you. >> thanks a
with a lot of self-confidence and comfortable in his own skin. in this town, any political environment, you have to get to know the other side and empathize with them. it's not one of his greatest ranks so far. >> you point that out today in your piece, learning how to smooz could be a difference between a good and great presidency for president obama. who f how do you think he's doing so far? >> it's a struggle for him. we saw with the negotiations with republicans specifically speaker boehner, granted the republicans aren't giving an inch and they are very hard-headed and aren't willing to accommodate. but past presidents have had just as tough if not tougher rivals to go up against. instead of running towards boehner and running towards his enemies up on the hill getting to know him. the small favors in politics, visits to the white house, sitting down for drinks, invitations on air force one, those are all small things and to the general public seem petty but they mean a lot in relationships. and the president was very good in springfield illinois, if you talked to people that worked wi
itself in an environment of which the president's won re-election and they don't want him to do anything he wants. they're also very muched concerned generally about what hagel probably intends to do and that is to continue panetta's effort to streamline the pentagon and make budget cuts. those who are in favor of a strong defense are against that and therefore against hagel's perception more cuts are necessary and finally there is a great deal of concern about hagel's statement that unilateral american action in trying to restrict what iran can do economically and with its money, hagel doesn't think that's a good thing to do and lots of people on both sides of the aisle in the senate who disagree with hagel about that and hearing about that in the hearings. >> it's interesting, colonel, that, again, going back to his war record and when you look at our nation as the president pointed out, could have a leader as secretary of defense who has been in that situation. he knows what it is like to have young men and women in the mud and the ground and like to see people, you go in to war with
and suburban environments particularly. because what we're looking at in montana is not quite the same as what we may be looking at in chicago or places around the nation. >> cynthia -- >> what do people need them for in montana? what do people need them for in montana? i grew up in alabama, in deepest, reddest alabama. my father loved hunting. i grew up with shotguns and rifles in the house. he never -- it was a rural area. he never felt the need to have an assault weapon. the deer weren't armed. so why do you need an assault weapon? i don't understand -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> i did not say assault weapon. >> why do you need one? >> i did not say an assault weapon. what i'm saying is when you're putting a solution in place we're still going to have to be mindful or the compliancy in chicago and new york city versus people in the big west. people such as residents in montana or the dakotas. we're going to have to be mindful. i'm not saying i'm defending people having assault weapons. those are weapons of war and they too often get in the hands of people that hurt folks throughout america
been in that environment. he had a wife and i think two children. he is representative of the force. and if you think not just to the service member but of the wife. the spousal husband whos ever back with the children with repetitive years gone, repetitive stresses and strains. they're an extraordinarily professional force. to my knowledge this is the first time we fought a lengthy war with a completely professional force. we don't really know the long term impact. it's held together well but there are a lot of disturbing numbers like suicides which worries me a lot. >> schieffer: it seems to me that we are asking a military to do more than it is designed to do. and people are talking about reducing the size of the military but it seems to me if we're going to ask the same of the military that we're asking now, we actually need a larger military. and i don't think that's going to happen. >> well, i would take it in a slightly different direction. we are asking the same military but i'm not sure it's a military that the american people know. most of us see a soldier or sailor airma
to answer to his royal grandchild about the state of the environment. >> i'm going to be confronted by my future grandchild. why didn't you do something? so clearly now there is a -- we'll have a grandchild, it makes it even more obvious. to try and make sure we have -- leave them something that isn't a totally poisoned chalice. >> prince charles revealed he does worry about his son harry serving in afghanistan. >>> forking over some serious dough for wonder bread. cnbc's mandy drury is here with what's moving your money. reports two bidders have emerged in the hostess bankruptcy talks to buy the bread part of the business. >> that's right. flowers foods and grupo. two names thrown around before reportedly in discussions to acquire pieces of the bread business as hostess is basically selling off assets now in a bankruptcy court auction which could be as soon as this week. there are reports of other interested parties. those two are supposedly the opening bidders. as for how much they might have to fork over, you've got the bread business and it's got lots of brands. things like wonder bre
diversity and we are in a tough political environment. with key cabinet picks already announced, the defense, state, and cia, the shift is now on others. >> does he settle on these names or still sifting through tough choices? >> he will make an announcement when he makes a decision. >> reporter: timothy geithner is expected to leave and although wall street and progressives are he can pressed concerns. someone with business expertise and with lisa jackson departing the environmental protection agency, a replacement is needed for her, too. it's a second-term ritual that douglas brinkley is often -- >> they pick people they wish they could have picked the first time around but you can't with the politics of a campaign when you're first making to the white house. >> reporter: climate is still a factor. susan rice withdrew her name to replace hillary clinton under pressure over her actions after the benghazi attacks. >> i think the political climate matters a lot now with who you pick. it shouldn't but it does. >> reporter: and there's pressure under the president to consider diversity after a
close to a 10, but given the domestic political environment, international situation, the weakness of our economy, you know, ugly nothing but a southerner he was in the cards, but it's worth looking at a 10 and comparing it to what we have two realize where we are not the best of all possible worlds at this point. okay, issue one is really the big enchilada, which is dealing with the long-term fiscal balance that we phase and i would have given a 10 to what folks were talking about, but was unachievable, which was the grand bargain between the president and the congressional leaders on a package of tax and spending policies that over the next 10, 12 years would've stabilized the debt to gdp ratio and that would've been a package somewhere in the two to $3 trillion range. of course there really wasn't time, the tightening between the election in january 1st to recover details. so if you respect even of the fact that we have a two political parties snarling at each other and not a whole lot in the way of negotiations, there really wasn't in the cards, but a nine, which would have com
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
medicare. it's about the environment. you talked about going on vacation and coming back and hearing the same thing. we're talking about the same thing from '95 as we are today. we haven't really decided yet what type of country we want to be and how we want to spend the money in order to get there. we spend a great deal of money on education. we probably spend more money per student than any other industrialized nations. yet when you look at the collective global testing, we're somewhere in the middle of the pack. so the conversation we need to be having isn't just about how much money or how are we spending that money, and is this moving us towards the type of country we want to be? >> that's much too complicated. i'm just kidding. >> this is the point. this is the debate. there has to be a debate. we're going to debate how we spend our money. we're now talking about when we have the debates. we should be having it in the traditional manner in which the governments operate. if we don't, we're going to be dealing with these cliffs. >> that's right. we shouldn't wait until the last m
be the state of our environment causing health issues. good point. >> we talked about the diversity of president obama'ska cabinet, lala writes in, give me a frickin' break 47 percent of his people are women. how about you people -- how about you folks in the media an especially the left spend your time yelling and screaming about different issues >> bill: i remind you of a picture of president obama with 10 of his closest advisors. all 10 were men. one was black. >> this is "the bill press show." i can't imagine anything better. you're getting a ton of shrimp and it tastes really good! [ male announcer ] hurry in to red lobster's 30 shrimp for just $11.99! choose any two of five savory shrimp selections like mango jalapeƑo shrimp and parmesan crunch shrimp. two delicious shrimp selections on one plate! all with salad and unlimited cheddar bay biscuits. 30 shrimp, just $11.99 for a limited time. wow, that's a lot of shrimp. i'm ryon stewart i'm the ultimate shrimp lover, and i sea food differently. [ music ] >> bill: good morning,
? >> about $135. and you go online and cut out the middleman. it's an a wholesale environment. that might be $250 above. people really respond to that and everybody can appreciate a value. >> a good story. a couple buddies making good. >> 200%. >> congratulations on ledbury and on your baby, more important. >>> coming up next, the president on the council of foreign relations. richard haass of the romney campaign, dan senore, much to talk about. also, mayor michael bloomberg of new york city and mika's dad, dr. brzezinski. >> well done, willie. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your
>> brian, we're all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us. their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i had done about iraq, ev before we went into iraq was conditioned by, tempered by that experience in vietnam and whatever i will ever do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shaped me just like anyone who has gone through war. those experiences shape you very much. and one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined, i suspect, to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things, diplomacy is critically important especially in a complicated world that we live in today. i think something else is important here
-- they should be going to an environment that will give them the best opportunity to learn and not to be engaged in this kind of activity with their teachers. >> the question in cases like this. to what extent the faculty member exerted power over the student. did the student feel pressured into it? regardless of gender, it's something you have to look at in cases like this. especially at the college level. definitely when they are younger than 18, there is no question. are are what is the difference between coach to athlete and boss to employee? isn't it the same thing? you always have the influence. you are, in fact, that person's coach and whether or not they like you or not, can they afford to not like you if you are coming onto them and they are the coach. maybe are you on scholarship and how you're in school. >> that's the side i would air on. i think you're right. >> at the end of the day what are the rules? apply them equally. it will be interesting to talk to her. she is a hall of famer, and she was injured very bad until an accident, and they thought she would never walk again. she wil
with a cascading flood of cuts. and for that kind of an environment, you don't need somebody who is an outsider who doesn't have the practical experience and who's nakedly ambitious for the job. >> tom cotton is a republican congressman, veteran of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. thank you for coming in. >> thank you, wolf. good to be here with you. >> why do you oppose the nomination of chuck hagel to be defense secretary? >> wolf, the president said that chuck hagel is the leader our troops deserve. i couldn't disagree any more strongly. our troops deserve much better than a man who voted to send them to war when it was popular and then abandon those very troops when it was unpopular. i would know, wolf. i was one of those troops. i returned from iraq in november 2006 with my platoon from the 101st airborne just as chuck hagel was writing that we couldn't achieve victory in iraq, that time for more troops had passed and it was time to withdraw. he just didn't oppose the surge, wolf. he called it the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country's history since vietnam. he delayed emerge
are bio degradable. that's good for the environment. >> how do you know so much about i crapped my pants. >> i'm wearing them and i just did. >> just say oops i crapped my pants. [ laughter ] [ applause ] >> like i wasn't already freaked out about the nora virus, that makes you spew out both ends. >> stephanie: didn't [ inaudible ] poop on a plane -- no he peed. something he was drunk and he peed in an aisle. >> french people are always drunk. sorry. >> stephanie: now the "stephanie miller show" wishes to apologize to pot heads, people who poop their pants and the french. thanks a lot. the entire hour -- >> what is my last name? it's french. >> lavoie. gym, you can settle down, paul krugman is not going to be secretary of the treasury. >> dammit. >> stephanie: all rights were circulating, and he said while he is flattered to be considered, the obama administration would result in [ inaudible ] he say oh and there's not a chance i would be confirmed. >> well, there's that. >> stephanie: can you imagine. right-wing heads just exploding. [ explosion ] >> yeah. >> stephani
. [video clip] >> we are all products of our experience and environment. i have been tempered by the experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy and military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose in power. no question much of the questioning i have done about iraq and was tempered by the experience in vietnam. whenever i will ever do in my life -- whatever i will do in my life, those experiences shaped me, just like anyone who has gone through war. those experiences shape you very much. it makes you less inclined to jump into war. it is easy to get into war, not very easy to get out, as evidenced by the johnson tapes. you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important, especially in the complicated world we live in today. i think something else is important here and a lesson we learned from vietnam. what is going to be very important for america is not to isolate ourselves in the wo
he kind of gets away with it. one area he has credibility is on the environment. many years ago before it was a mainstream subject, he was championing protecting the rain forest and wildlife. he was talking about that today on british tv and he made a few comments. he says since he found out he's going to become a grandfather, the duchess of cambridge is obviously pregnant, his opinions about conservation have actually become much stronger. >> have gone on for years about importance of thinking, about the long term, in relation to environmental damage, climate change, everything else. because we don't really in a sense airline world want to hand on an increasingly dysfunctional world to our grandchildren. and i don't want to be confronted by my future grandchild say, why didn't you do something. so clearly, now that there's a -- we'll have a grandchild, obviously, it makes it even more obvious, you know, to try and make sure we have them, leave them something that isn't a totally poisoned -- >> this is something, wolf, he spoke about in the past. he thinks it's the greatest thre
environment. i have been in a lot of play-off games, richard. this is one of the best i have seen. i think that has to do in large part to the fact that, you know they haven't had a play-off game in well over a decade. this was a team that was 3 and 6. they needed today reevaluate for next year. there are a lot of positives there. they had some fantastic pieces with morris and rg3 but the environment was at the same time that you have a young man whose career you don't want to jeopardize and tarrant williams fantastic but they did not protect him the second half as well. they couldn't run and you have a guy like kirk cousins who has been terrific when given the opportunity. a lot of people were calling for shanahan's head. whether it's fear or not i don't know. >> that's interesting because i was watching at home and following on twitter. there were a lot of comments from people saying he's got to come out. he's got to come out. >> yeah. >> especially whether they were up 14 to nothing why bother drafting a guy like curt cousins who has been very effective when
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)